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Malicious Attack on Neteller Users Be Aware

Malicious Attack on Neteller Users - Be Aware!

In case you have received an e-mail that appears to be from Neteller within the last couple of days, you should at all cost avoid clicking on any links that are inside the e-mail.

Malicious Attack via E-mail

The e-mail is a malicious attack done by criminals who try and retrieve login and credit card details of Neteller users. This e-mail was sent out not long after Skrill announced they would be closing down all Canadian accounts, in an effort to make people believe Neteller was doing the same. However, the e-mail was not only sent to Canadians but to every Neteller user.

Skrill has, since 2014 started, discontinued their service to Canadians who were using their wallet service for gambling transactions. This came as a shock to the Canadian gambling community. The attack was launched in an attempt to take advantage of customers in doubt, which might’ve thought that Neteller would be doing the same as Skrill and block Canadian users that use their wallet for gambling transactions.

An Easy Trap To Fall Into

We received an e-mail from one of our members, who clicked the link in the e-mail, but luckily discovered the scam before it was too late. With our help he would like to warn the poker community about this scam. Scammers will empty your account and credit cards if you follow the steps that are provided by them after clicking the link in the e-mail.

The e-mail we received was sent out around 06.00 CET on Sunday January 26th. At least thousands of Neteller users are suspected to have received this e-mail, as a Neteller customer service employee voiced that this has been one of the largest fraudulent attempts in the company’s history.

It’s believed, through contact with Neteller customer service that they cannot guarantee the safety of all users who have followed the instructions and lost their money. The e-mail was most likely sent early in the morning to Neteller users, so that criminals could avoid mass communication about it, before multiple victims had fallen into their trap.

The e-mail looks like a professional e-mail from Neteller, using correct grammar, linking to the Neteller Facebook and Twitter account and it includes the registration e-mail that users had used for their Neteller accounts. The only real giveaway in the e-mail is that the sender address says Neteeller.Net and not, but this is something many people will not notice at first sight. The content of the e-mail is as following:

The E-mail Message

Dear (e-mail registered with Neteller)

We would like to inform you that your account is pending closure for failing to accept the new NeteIIer Account Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy until the 31th of January, 2014.

This is your last and final warning. To avoid account closure, please follow the link below and confirm your personal information. Failing to do so until the 31th of January, 2014 will be considered a denial of our terms and conditions and your account will be permanently closed.

Neteller Scam Picture

Clicking on the "Click Here" button will then take you to a copy of Neteller's website, where you will be asked to insert you login details including your secure ID, your credit card details and lastly accept the new terms and conditions that Neteller has.

You can see a screenshot of the website that the e-mail sends you to, so that you can see how identical to Neteller's own site it is. Again the only giveaway that there’s foul play is based on the URL, which once again shows Neteeller.Net instead of

Neteller Scam Picture

Neteller has informed us that they have requested to have the false domain deleted. Deleting the domain is not something that will happen instantly and it may take up to 72 hours from the discovery was made until the site has been taken down.

There have been reports of several victims in this case that lost money from their Neteller account, as well as on their personal credit cards. Because of the gravity of this case it’s important to spread the information around to the community and ensure that nobody else will fall into the trap of these criminals.

Please make sure to tell your friends about the e-mail, and emphasize they will not click on it. If you have received the e-mail and followed through with the different steps provided, then we recommend that you change check your computer for malicious viruses, change your passwords, notify your bank and contact Neteller to see if they can help in any sort of way.

In case of emergency you can call Neteller by using this number: +1 403 212 3025

News by Daniel Allermand
Daniel Allermand - Reporter

Daniel Allermand is a freelance writer, with more than 4 years of experience in the industry as an operator, affiliate and poker player. Daniel has decided it was time to try and bring more coverage about the industry to the general public by writing articles about everything from poker to casino.


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